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20121205
20121213
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. >>> over in the united states, president barack obama is urging republicans to approve a tax hike on the wealthy. he says this is needed to avert the impending fiscal cliff of automatic austerity measures that could drag the economy into recession. obama said on wednesday that federal revenues will not reach the level needed to implement his proposals to cut the deficit unless taxes are raised on the wealthy. >> there is a bottom-line amount of revenue that is required in order for us to get a real, meaningful deficit reduction plan. >> obama added that if republican officials acknowledged this reality, the actual numbers proposed by each party are not that far apart. republicans have made a counteroffer. they want to raise revenue by reviewing the current tax deduke system. house speaker john boehner has urged the president to compromise. >> our members believe strongly that raising tax rates will hurt the economy. now we need a response from the white house. >> unless the two sides reach an agreement by the end of this year, the automatic tax increases and spending cuts will tak
not sure republicans will go along unless there is some give on obama's part. >> unconditional surrender, mark? >> i am not sure with the exact policy is. the president has the advantage and the factors you are seeing are on the republican side. the democrats' ranks are totally unified. but i think it is important when the president does prevail, which i think he will in this showdown, all but certain, that there be -- that it be done in a way that john boehner leaves with his dignity intact and a sense that he has achieved something. if it is just -- humiliation cannot be a byproduct. >> colby? >> it would not be a defeat for obama in any way. we go over the cliff, a stop because republicans sent over the cliff. -- it is because republicans send us over the cliff, not doing what americans want us to do. the american people think we ought to increase the rates. there is a principle there. they give on that, then the president has to do something on entitlements and put something on the table that is tangible, and we will have to deal. but if it they don't rely on those rates, we will go
talks. the obama administration and opposition republicans remain at odds over how to avert the falling off the fiscal cliff. let's take a look at currency markets. the dollar is also little change against the yen as u.s. budget talks continue. dollar/yen is in the upper 81 levels, 81.88 to 90. the euro, that is higher against the yen, 107.27 to 30 at the moment. worries are reseeding over eurozone debts. let's take a look at other markets in the apple open. kospi is trading flat on the day, 1,934. looking at australia, the benchmark index is trading higher by 1/10 of a percent, 4,508. modest moves so far this morning in the asia pacific. >>> japan and india launched a new framework to provide bilateral credit in u.s. dollars. the aim is to ease the impact of possible turmoil in the global financial markets on asia. the two countries worked out the details on tuesday. japan's prime minister and his indian counterpart had signed the currency agreement a year ago. under the framework both countries will be able to exchange up to $15 billion over the next three years. the two countries had
and women. back then, senator barack obama opposed the fcc's proposal. so did senators joe biden and hillary clinton. but now, president obama's man at the fcc -- they were friends in law school -- apparently wants to do what the republicans couldn't do under president bush, and to do it behind the scenes, out of sight, with no public hearings. several public interest groups, civil rights organizations and labor unions opposed the move, and last week, senator bernie sanders and several of his colleagues called on chairman genachowski to hold off. bernie sanders is an outspoken opponent of media consolidation. he sees it as a threat to democracy. once the mayor of burlington, vermont, he served 16 years in the house of representatives and was recently re-elected to his second term in the senate. he's the longest serving independent in the history of congress. he was in new york earlier this week and we met for this interview. welcome. good to see you again. >> good to be with you, bill. >> this is a strong letter, inspired one of your colleagues in the senate says, by you. what's the beef? >>
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4